Archeomagnetic and paleomagnetic dating

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Early in the 20th century, work by David, Brunhes and Mercanton showed that many rocks were magnetized antiparallel to the field. His intent was to test his theory that the geomagnetic field was related to the Earth's rotation, a theory that he ultimately rejected; but the astatic magnetometer became the basic tool of paleomagnetism and led to a revival of the theory of continental drift.

Japanese geophysicist Motonori Matuyama showed that the Earth's magnetic field reversed in the mid-Quaternary, a reversal now known as the Brunhes-Matuyama reversal. Alfred Wegener first proposed in 1915 that continents had once been joined together and had since moved apart.

The paleomagnetic tool is mainly used to determine movements of the main tectonic plates and paleocontinental reconstruction (e.g.

The record of geomagnetic reversals preserved in volcanic and sedimentary rock sequences (magnetostratigraphy) provides a time-scale that is used as a geochronologic tool.

Geophysicists who specialize in paleomagnetism are called paleomagnetists.

The models show a ridge (a) about 5 million years ago (b) about 2 to 3 million years ago and (c) in the present.

Paleomagnetism (or palaeomagnetism in the United Kingdom) is the study of the record of the Earth's magnetic field in rocks, sediment, or archeological materials.

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