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Email scam is an unsolicited email that claims the prospect of a bargain or something for nothing.

Some scam messages ask for business, others invite victims to a website with a detailed pitch.

If you’re not paying attention, you might end up giving your login credentials and other personal information.

We’ve seen many spam email campaigns in which phishing were the main attack vector for malicious criminals used to spread financial and data stealing malware.

Use the links below to quickly navigate the list of online scams you need to stay away from right now.

Phishing email scams The Nigerian scam Greeting card scams Bank loan or credit card scam Lottery scam Hitman scam Romance scams Fake antivirus software Facebook impersonation scam (hijacked profile scam) Make money fast scams (Economic scams) Travel scams Bitcoin scams Fake news scam Fake shopping websites Loyalty points phishing scam Job offer scams SMS Scaming(Smshing) Overpayment Online Scam Tech Support Online Scams More than one third of all security incidents start with or malicious attachments sent to company employees, according to a new report from F-Secure.

A typical Nigerian scam involves an emotional email, letter, text message or social networking message coming from a scammer (which can be an official government member, a businessman or a member of a very wealthy family member – usually a woman) who asks you to give help in retrieving a large sum of money from a bank, paying initially small fees for papers and legal matters.

After you fill in your online banking credentials, cyber criminals use them to breach your real bank account or to sell them on the dark web to other interested parties.

Here’s an example of a sophisticated email scam making the rounds that you should be very careful.

According to a from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), millennials are particularly more vulnerable to online scams than seniors, as shocking as it may seem.

The research finds that “40 percent of adults age 20-29 who have reported fraud ended up losing money in a fraud case”.

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