Validating the vision statements

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Consider values of customers, shareholders, employees and the community. Notice any differences between the organization’s preferred values and its true values (the values actually reflected by members’ behaviors in the organization).Record each preferred value on a flash card, then have each member “rank” the values with 1, 2, or 3 in terms of the priority needed by the organization with 3 indicating the value is very important to the organization and 1 is least important.Under this section, I will be looking at the core values that the company has been working on.Given any company’s environment analysis, internal analysis is the first thing to accomplish.They often drive the intent and direction for “organic” planners. Developing a values statement can be quick culture-specific, i.e., participants may use methods ranging from highly analytical and rational to highly creative and divergent, e.g., focused discussions, divergent experiences around daydreams, sharing stories, etc.Therefore, visit with the participants how they might like to arrive at description of their organizational values. Establish four to six core values from which the organization would like to operate.By developing a vision statement or statements, your organization clarifies the beliefs and governing principles of your organization, first for yourselves, and then for the greater community.There are certain characteristics that most vision statements have in common.

Those values will be the source materials of validating the values statements of the company.

Then go through the cards again to rank how people think the values are actually being enacted in the organization with 3 indicating the values are fully enacted and 1 indicating the value is hardly reflected at all.

Then address discrepancies where a value is highly preferred (ranked with a 3), but hardly enacted (ranked with a 1). Incorporate into the strategic plan, actions to align actual behavior with preferred behaviors.

Recently, the vision has become more of a motivational tool, too often including highly idealistic phrasing and activities which the organization cannot realistically aspire. Values represent the core priorities in the organization’s culture, including what drives members’ priorities and how they truly act in the organization, etc.

Values are increasingly important in strategic planning.

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